Top 9 Pregnancy intercourse Myths, Debunked
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Intercourse during pregnancy can be a little overwhelming to expect couples. Although the love hormones play cupid in the midst of the numerous aches and pains of pregnancy. The different myths surrounding the act prohibit them from having a good lovemaking session. One should know that while couples during pregnancy need to be careful about sex, it’s not off-limits. Sex can be a pleasurable and pleasant experience for most pregnant couples apart from the first trimester and the last four weeks before delivery. It is therefore critical that you do not prey to common pregnancy intercourse myths like the following.

Nevertheless, most of the pregnancy and sex-related risks are myths that can be debunked. Here are a few of them.

Pregnancy Intercourse Myths

Around pregnancy, there are many myths that people feel the need to follow. Many of them occur during pregnancy around having sex. Most of them are easily debunked, and in fact, during pregnancy, many people should be able to continue their regular sex lives.

1. Penetration is harmful to the fetus

In most pregnancies a partner’s penis will not hurt the baby and during penetrative sex will not make contact with the baby. The baby is covered by the amniotic sac and its fluid as well as the walls of the uterus.

2. The sex drive of a pregnant person is disappears

In reality, a pregnant person may have a higher sex drive. Indeed, during pregnancy, some people’s libido skyrocket. During the second trimester, many women experience an increase in hormones that can lead to an increased sex drive.

3. Sex always induces labor during pregnancy

Sex does not induce labor. It would have been nice for couples to have something safe, effective, and maybe even fun to use to help them get to labor a little earlier if they wanted to.

4. Orgasm contractions can lead to miscarriage

The contractions felt during orgasms and the contractions experienced during birth are completely different types of contractions.

In addition, during pregnancy, you may even experience orgasms more easily.

Nevertheless, if you have a history of miscarriages, premature birth, if your cervix is unstable or dilated, or if you have unexplained vaginal bleeding or discharge, talk with your doctor.

5. Spotting is a cause for concern

Excess bleeding is an entirely different story and should definitely cause alarm, but sometimes spotting after sex while pregnant is relatively normal because the cervix is very sensitive.

However, if you are still uncertain or have doubts, it is best to double-check your health with your doctor.

6. There’s no question of oral sex

Just because a person is pregnant doesn’t mean that they can’t get their partner down on them.

In fact, depending on the term of pregnancy, it may sometimes be a more comfortable option than penetrative intercourse. The American Pregnancy Association, however, advises that the partner of a pregnant person does not blow air into the vagina during the oral because “a bubble may cause a differential pressure that may burst blood vessels near the surface.”

7. The baby will know

There is no need to be embarrassed about having sex while pregnant, it is perfectly normal and the baby will not be traumatized. It doesn’t know what you’re doing and it won’t remember what’s going on.

8. During pregnancy, all positions are safe

At some point, it is best to avoid the position of a missionary. During pregnancy, sex in the missionary style may not be the best choice by the 20-week mark.

For an extended period of time, when a pregnant woman lies flat on her back, the weight of the uterus will obstruct the necessary blood flow to the rest of her body and infant.

9. It is not possible for pregnant people to use their vibrators

During pregnancy, vibrators are safe to use as long as they are kept clean and germ-free, which is standard practice — pregnant or not.

These are the top 9 pregnancy intercourse myths which a pregnant couple should avoid.

There is no reason to stop having intercourse during pregnancy, “as long as there is no excessive vaginal bleeding placenta previa, premature labor, cervical insufficiency, or other severe risks.

Also Read: Is It Safe To Resume Sex After Delivery?